Approximate Love Boat

by Low Res

/
1.
04:05
2.
06:01
3.
04:33
4.
04:01
5.
05:39
6.
02:04
7.
06:07
8.
05:02
9.
05:24
10.
11.
12.
06:54
13.
02:59
14.
02:04

about

Finally, after ages of searching for a coherent signal amid the omnipresent noise of space, a startling image appeared on the screen, complete with coordinates indicating the exact point of origin. Three words only, their meaning indecipherable, yet clearly a product of intention and not some deceptive coincidental geometry as had so often proven disappointing in the past. Three words, 'The Love Boat', and then a lapse to the same noise which had filled the Lomaxians' displays for generations. But the coordinates were there, and though this planet, "The Love Boat", was very, very distant, it was calculated that an expedition could reach there within one-third of a lifespan. A team of musicologists and engineers was dispatched to collect and classify the musical assets of this planet in their entirety. More mundane data would perhaps be taken on subsequent expeditions.
The expedition was extremely successful, collecting the entire recorded output of the 'Love Boat' planet, and the crew reversed their course for the long journey home.
Disaster struck somewhere near the midpoint of the return trip. While performing some preliminary analyses, a series of erroneous commands was entered into the system causing all of the painstakingly gathered data to be irretrievably deleted.
Having already reported success and their intention to return home, the crew knew that grave consequences were inevitable. So they set about to recreate the wondrous musics they had heard at "The Love Boat" with the technologies available to them on board the space craft in hopes of concealing this very costly error. From memory, the musicologists did what they could, knowing that only a crude approximation would be possible, but retaining hope that their superiors would be convinced of the work's authenticity.

credits

released November 11, 1998

all content ©defective music (ASCAP)

tags

license

all rights reserved

about

Low Res Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Low Res (Daniel Zelonky) debuted in 1995 on Japan's Sublime Records with the popular track "Amuck" on his "Thorn EP". Subsequent releases have appeared on Plug Research, Mille Plateaux, Metroplex, Scape, Schematic, K7, etc.

contact / help

Contact Low Res

Streaming and
Download help

Shipping and returns

Redeem code

Track Name: Love Boat
Finally, after ages of searching for a coherent signal amid the omnipresent noise of space, a startling image appeared on the screen, complete with coordinates indicating the exact point of origin. Three words only, their meaning indecipherable, yet clearly a product of intention and not some deceptive coincidental geometry as had so often proven disappointing in the past. Three words, 'The Love Boat', and then a lapse to the same noise which had filled the Lomaxians' displays for generations. But the coordinates were there, and though this planet, "The Love Boat", was very, very distant, it was calculated that an expedition could reach there within one-third of a lifespan. A team of musicologists and engineers was dispatched to collect and classify the musical assets of this planet in their entirety. More mundane data would perhaps be taken on subsequent expeditions.
The expedition was extremely successful, collecting the entire recorded output of the 'Love Boat' planet, and the crew reversed their course for the long journey home.
Disaster struck somewhere near the midpoint of the return trip. While performing some preliminary analyses, a series of erroneous commands was entered into the system causing all of the painstakingly gathered data to be irretrievably deleted.
Having already reported success and their intention to return home, the crew knew that grave consequences were inevitable. So they set about to recreate the wondrous musics they had heard at "The Love Boat" with the technologies available to them on board the space craft in hopes of concealing this very costly error. From memory, the musicologists did what they could, knowing that only a crude approximation would be possible, but retaining hope that their superiors would be convinced of the work's authenticity.